Correlations

The Little, Brown Handbook, 9th Edition ©2004

Fowler, Aaron

Correlated to: National Advanced Placement® (AP®) English Literature and Composition Course Objectives (Grades 9–12)

SE = Student Edition
TE = Teacher Edition
TECH = Technology
TR = Teaching Resources
WB = Little Brown Handbook Workbook ©2004 (Gorrell)

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

The Course: The AP® Language and Composition course assumes that students already understand and use standard English grammar. The intense concentration on language use in this course should enhance their ability to use grammatical conventions both appropriately and with sophistication as well as to develop stylistic maturity in their prose. Stylistic development is nurtured by emphasizing the following:
• a wide-ranging vocabulary used appropriately and effectively; SE/TE: developing vocabulary, 17, 73, 94, 119, 152–153, 580–588
WB: 547–552
TR: 356–358
TECH: transparencies, 43.1a, 43.1b
• a variety of sentence structures, including appropriate use of subordination and coordination; SE/TE: understanding the basic sentence, 239–245, expanding sentences, 249–250, classifying sentences, 273–274, using coordination and subordination, 415, 427
WB: sentence structure, 157–208, subordination, 387–397
TECH: transparencies, 24.1, 24.2
• a logical organization, enhanced by specific techniques to increase coherence, such as repetition, transitions, and emphasis; SE/TE: organization, 42–43, emphasis, 81–82, repetition, 84–85, 41
WB: organization,20–24, 126–127
TECH: creating a web site, 224–230
• a balance of generalization and specific illustrative detail; and SE/TE: generalizations 157, 160, 167–170, details, 91–92, 147–151
WB: generalizations 122
• an effective use of rhetoric, including controlling tone, establishing and maintaining voice, and achieving appropriate emphasis through diction and sentence structure. SE/TE: tone, 152–153, 659, 792, voice 270–271, 314–315, 406
WB: voice, 205, 243–244, emphasis 379–386
TR: emphasis 267
TECH: transparencies 23.1
Upon completing the Language and Composition course, then, students should be able to:
• analyze and interpret samples of good writing, identifying and explaining an author's use of rhetorical strategies and techniques; SE/TE: analyze writing 29, 124–127, 786, 803–807, 813
WB: 91–92, 101–104
TR: 158–159
TECH: transparencies 6.1, 6.5
• apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing; SE/TE: critical approach to writing 29–30, 137–140, developing or planning 19–46
WB: assessing the writing 1–6, developing ideas 13–25
TR: assessing writing 91–92
TECH: web models p. 93
• create and sustain arguments based on readings, research, and/or personal experience; SE/TE: arguments 142, 159–160, 172–173, personal experience 795
WB: analyzing an argument 124–125, 129–131
TR: reading arguments 158–159, 168
TECH: transparencies 6.1, 6.2, 6.3
• demonstrate understanding and mastery of standard written English as well as stylistic maturity in their own writings; SE/TE: standard american english 17–18, 542–543
WB: standard english 517–518
TR: appropriate language 335–339,
TECH: transparencies 38.1
• write in a variety of genres and contexts, both formal and informal, employing appropriate conventions; SE/TE: formal/informal language 17–18, 542, 544–545
TR: reading & writing about literature 411–416
TECH: transparencies 52.1a, 52.1b, 52.2, 52.3
• produce expository and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate, specific evidence, cogent explanations, and clear transitions; and SE/TE: exposition 13–14, argumentative writing 163–167, 142–144, 173–174
WB: argumentative composition 105–112, 124–125, 126–131
TR: writing an argument 168
TECH: transparencies 7.3, 7.4, 7.5
• move effectively through the stages of the writing process, with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review. SE/TE: writing process 2–8, 9–16, 65–68, 137–140, 231–236
WB: drafting 33–39, 147, revising 45–46, editing 265–266

Reference: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com

AP® is a trademark registered and/or owned by the College Board, which was not involved in the production of, and does not endorse, this site.