Correlations

The Little, Brown Handbook, 10th Edition ©2007

H. Ramsey Fowler, Jane E. Aaron

Correlated to: Advanced Placement® (AP®) English Language and Composition Course Objectives

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

The chart below provides a correlation between the Advanced Placement® (AP®) English Language and Composition course objectives and coverage in the high school version of The Little, Brown Handbook.

The Course: The AP® Language and Composition course assumes that students already understand and use standard English grammar. The intense concentration on language use in this course should enhance their ability to use grammatical conventions both appropriately and with sophistication as well as to develop stylistic maturity in their prose. Stylistic development is nurtured by emphasizing the following:
• a wide-ranging vocabulary used appropriately and effectively; chapter 6 section e; chapter 37 sections b, c, d; chapter 38 sections a, c; chapter 40 sections a, b
• a variety of sentence structures, including appropriate use of subordination and coordination; chapter 12 sections c, d; chapter 17 sections b, e; chapter 24 sections a, b, c; chapter 25 section a; chapter 26 sections a, b, d
• a logical organization, enhanced by specific techniques to increase coherence, such as repetition, transitions, and emphasis; chapter 2 section c; chapter 4 sections b, e; chapter 10 section g; chapter 23 section e; chapter 25 section a, b; chapter 39 section c; chapter 46 section a; chapter 56 section c
• a balance of generalization and specific illustrative detail; and chapter 2 sections a, c; chapter 5 section d; chapter 10 sections d, e
• an effective use of rhetoric, including controlling tone, establishing and maintaining voice, and achieving appropriate emphasis through diction and sentence structure. chapter 1 section d; chapter 2 section a; chapter 4 section c; chapter 8 section a; chapter 9 section e; chapter 10 section c; chapter 20 section c; chapter 26 sections a, b. d
Upon completing the Language and Composition course, students should be able to do the following:
• analyze and interpret samples of good writing, identifying and explaining an author's use of rhetorical strategies and techniques; chapter 1 sections b; chapter 3 section c; chapter 6 section b; chapter 7 section d; chapter 8 section a, c; chapter 10 section c; chapter 50 sections a, c, f
• apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing; chapter 2 sections a, b, c; chapter 4 sections c, d; chapter 8 section c
• create and sustain arguments based on readings, research, and/or personal experience; chapter 9 sections a, b; chapter 10 sections a, d, e, g, h; chapter 11 sections a, b; chapter 50 section a
• write for a variety of purposes; chapter 1 section e; chapter 6 sections b, c; chapter 10 section c; chapter 44 section a; chapter 56 section b
• produce expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary and/or secondary sources, cogent explanations, and clear transitions; chapter 2 sections a, b, c; chapter 8 section c; chapter 10 sections a, b; chapter 11 sections a, b; chapter 42 sections b, d; chapter 43 sections a, b, e, g; chapter 46 sections a, b; chapter 47 sections a, b; chapter 49 section d; chapter 50 section d; chapter 51 section d; chapter 52 section 4; chapter 53 section d; chapter 54 sections a, c; chapter 55 sections a, c, d; chapter 56 section a; chapter 57 section c
• demonstrate understanding and mastery of standard written English as well as stylistic maturity in their own writings; chapter 6 section e; chapter 37 sections a, c, d; chapter 38 sections a, c
• demonstrate understanding of the conventions of citing primary and secondary sources; chapter 42 sections d, e; chapter 43 sections a, b, d, e, f; chapter 44 sections a, b, e; chapter 45 sections d, e; chapter 47 sections a, c; chapter 48 section d; chapter 50 section d; chapter 51 section d; chapter 52 sections d, f; chapter 53 section d
• move effectively through the stages of the writing process, with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review; chapter 1 sections b, c, d, e; chapter 2 sections a, b, c; chapter 3 sections a, b ,d , e; chapter 4 section e; chapter 10 sections a, b, c, d, g, h; chapter 46 section a, b; chapter 50 section e
• write thoughtfully about their own process of composition; chapter 2 section a; chapter 3 sections a, b, e, h; chapter 4 sections c, d, e; chapter 5 section a; chapter 6 section a; chapter 8 section c; chapter 10 sections b, d, e, f, g, h; chapter 42 section b; chapter 46 sections a, b; chapter 50 sections b, e, f; chapter 55 sections a, c, d; chapter 56 section a; chapter 57 section c
• revise a work to make it suitable for a different audience; chapter 3 sections b, c, d, e; chapter 10 section h; chapter 37 sections g, h; chapter 46 section b; chapter 50 section e
• analyze image as text; and chapter 5 sections c, d; chapter 8 section b; chapter 11 sections a, b; chapter 43 section h
• evaluate and incorporate reference documents into researched papers. chapter 42 sections d, e; chapter 43 sections a, b, d, e, f, g; chapter 44 sections a, b, c, e; chapter 45 sections d, e; chapter 47 section c; chapter 49 section d; chapter 50 section d; chapter 51 sections a, d; chapter 52 section d; chapter 53 section d

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