Correlations

The Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers, 6th Edition ©2003

Reid

Correlated to: National Advanced Placement® (AP®) English Literature and Composition Course Objectives (Grades 9–12)

SE = Student Edition
AIE = Annotated Instructor's Edition

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

The Course: The AP® Language and Composition course assumes that students already understand and use standard English grammar. The intense concentration on language use in this course should enhance their ability to use grammatical conventions both appropriately and with sophistication as well as to develop stylistic maturity in their prose. Stylistic development is nurtured by emphasizing the following:
• a wide-ranging vocabulary used with denotative accuracy and connotative resourcefulness; SE/AIE: Definitions, in writing: 86–87, 320; Dictionary Use: 575–576; Diction and Style Usage Glossary: 675–688; Vague Words: 676–678; Journal exercises: 10, 62, 70, 78–79, 113, 121, 129, 180, 186, 229, 234, 242, 276–278, 294, 299, 306, 320, 351, 357, 364, 399–400, 405, 414, 463, 469–470, 476–477, 479, 481, 510
• a variety of sentence structures, including appropriate use of subordination and coordination; SE/AIE: Review of Basic Sentence Elements: 648–675, 690–691, 698
• a logical organization, enhanced by specific techniques of coherence such as repetition, transitions, and emphasis; SE/AIE: Shaping Writing: 11, 31, 36–43, 83–89, 133–138, 193–199, 252–256, 311–318, 320–321, 369–372, 374, 421–424, 426, 486–488, 543–545, 591–593, 634–637; Transitions and emphasis: 193–199; Transitional Words and Phrases: 92, 317, 320–321, 374, 426
• a balance of generalization with specific illustrative detail; and SE/AIE: 22–23, 31–33, 42, 48–49, 83, 92, 105–110, 130–133, 138, 140–141, 153–155, 160–161, 203, 205–206, 211, 213–215, 246–247, 252–253, 258, 267, 270, 274–280, 294–295, 300, 306–312, 316, 319–321, 328, 331, 334–341, 343–344, 351–352, 358–359, 364–370, 373–374, 384, 390–396, 414–426, 439, 442–456, 470, 483–490, 492–494, 503, 510–511, 518–522, 541–547, 552, 555, 559, 570–574, 591–592, 598, 632, 638–641 Collecting details: 31–33; observing detail: 48–49; observation of detail in shaping writing: 83–84; professional writer's essay on: 41–41; remembering details: 105–110
• an effective use of rhetoric, including controlling tone, maintaining a consistent voice, and achieving emphasis through parallelism and antithesis. SE/AIE: Active and passive voice: 666–668. 676–685, 699, 701; misconceptions about rhetoric: 4; Orientation to rhetorical stance: xxiii–xxiv; Voice and tone: 135–137, 141, 156, 313, 524, 655
Upon completing the Language and Composition course, then, students should be able to:
• analyze and interpret samples of good writing, identifying and explaining an author's use of rhetorical strategies and techniques; SE/AIE: Questions for Writing and Discussion: 30, 42–43, 45, 62–63, 70–71, 79, 101, 113–114, 121–122, 129–130, 142–149, 151–158, 160–165, 181, 186–188, 191–202, 205–206, 211, 230, 234–235, 300, 306–307, 328–329, 331, 351–352, 358–359, 364–366, 386–387, 400–401, 405–406, 414–415432, 438–439, 464, 470–471, 482–483, 502, 510–511, 532, 539–547, 555; Peer response/review: 91, 139, 319, 373, 425, 491–492, 551–552; Responding to literature essay: 513–518, 518–520, 521–524; Journal exercises: 170–171, 344, 637; In essay tests: 631–641
• apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing; SE/AIE: Editing and Proofreading: 644–648; Techniques: 3–5, 5–15, 21–26, 31–45, 49–50. The Writing Process: 80–93, 130–141, 160–165, 188, 191–202. 214, 244–256, 258, 275–283, 307–318, 320–321, 334–341, 343–344, 366–374, 390–396, 415–426, 442–456, 483–495, 518–524, 540–547, 551–552, 559–599, Writing Under Pressure: 631–638
• create and sustain arguments based on readings, research, and/or personal experience; SE/AIE: Technique for: 22–23, 131–132, 154–156, 163, 521, 544–545, 570–571. 591; Argument essay: 442–443, 444–448, 448–452, 454–455, 484–485. 487–488, 490. 492–494
• demonstrate understanding and mastery of standard written English as well as stylistic maturity in their own writings; SE/AIE: Drafting an Revising: 31, 32–33, 43–45, 83–89, 89–93, 133–141, 188–202, 244–256, 307–321, 366–375, 415–426, 483–495, 540–547, 569–573; Shaping Strategies: 591–598, 637–638
• write in a variety of genres and contexts, both formal and informal, employing appropriate conventions; SE/AIE: Journal writing: 54–55, 109–110, 170–171, 220–222, 282–283, 343–344, 395–396, 455–456, 519–520, 563; Observational writing: 80–93; Memoir: 130–141; Responding to Writing: 188–201; Investigating: 244–258; Explanatory writing: 307–321; Evaluating: 366–374; Problem solving: 415–426; Arguing: 483–494; Responding to Literature: 540–546; Research Paper: 569–574, 591–594; Documenting Sources: 598–615
• produce expository and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate, specific evidence, cogent explanations, and clear transitions; and SE/AIE: Explanatory essay writing: 307–321; Composing and shaping arguments: 31, 32–33, 43–45, 83–89, 89–93, 133–141, 188–202, 244–256, 366–375, 415–426, 483–495, 540–547, 569–573, 591–598, 637–638
• move effectively through the stages of the writing process, with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review. SE/AIE: Journal writing: 54–55, 109–110, 170–171, 220–222, 282–283, 343–344, 395–396, 455–456, 519–520, 563; Observational writing: 80–93; Memoir: 130–141; Responding to Writing: 188–201; Investigating: 244–258; Explanatory writing: 307–321; Evaluating: 366–374; Problem solving: 415–426; Arguing: 483–494; Responding to Literature: 540–546; Research Paper: 569–574, 591–594; Documenting Sources: 598–615

Representative Authors

There is no recommended or required reading list for the AP® English Language and Composition course. The following authors are provided simply to suggest the range and quality of reading expected in the course. Teachers may select authors from the names below or may choose others of comparable quality and complexity.

Autobiographers and Diarists
Benjamin Franklin SE/AIE: 44–45
Helen Keller SE/AIE: 110–113
Essayists and Fiction Writers
N. Scott Momaday SE/AIE: 107
Alice Walker SE/AIE: 122–129
Eudora Welty SE/AIE: 524–523
Journalists
John Adams SE/AIE: 44–45
Thomas Jefferson SE/AIE: 44–45
Science and Nature Writers
Edward Abbey SE/AIE: 464–469
Wendell Berry SE/AIE: 396–399
David Quammen SE/AIE: 181–186
Additional Authors
Russell Baker SE/AIE: 19–20
Toni Cade Bambara SE/AIE: 533–539
Kate Chopin SE/AIE: 516–518
Barbara Ehrenreich SE/AIE: 158–160
Pico Iyer SE/AIE: 295–299
Barbara Kingsolver SE/AIE: 63–70
Edward Koch SE/AIE: 472–476
Nicholas Lemann SE/AIE: 174–180
Farley Mowatt SE/AIE: 71–78
Samuel Scudder SE/AIE: 58–63
John O'Sullivan SE/AIE: 479–481
Mike Royko SE/AIE: 456–458
Elizabeth Wong SE/AIE: 27–28
Emily Prager SE/AIE: 171–173
Robert Badinter SE/AIE: 477–478
Dudley Erskine Devlin SE/AIE: 189–191
Margaret Lazarus SE/AIE: 344–345
Mike Rose SE/AIE: 114–121
Robert Zoellner SE/AIE: 28–30
Deborah Tannen SE/AIE: 301–306, 401–405
Anastasia Toufexis SE/AIE: 217–219
Charlene Muehlenhard SE/AIE: 215–216
Melaney Linton SE/AIE: 215–216
Margaret Talbot SE/AIE: 284–294
Cathleen Cleaver SE/AIE: 458–463
Gene Cowan SE/AIE: 222–223
Elizabeth Larsen SE/AIE: 224–225
Neil Postman SE/AIE: 406–414
Connie Koenen SE/AIE: 225–229
Jeremiah Creedon SE/AIE: 231–234
Jonathan Kozol SE/AIE: 236–242
Neil Petrie SE/AIE: 36–42
Roy Hoffman SE/AIE: 12–15
David Ansen SE/AIE: 341–343
Kathryn Hughes SE/AIE: 346–351
Ben Rogers SE/AIE: 346–351
Elayne Rapping SE/AIE: 359–364
Geoffrey Cowley SE/AIE: 352–357
Joan Barthel SE/AIE: 219–220

Reference: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com

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