Correlations

The Prentice Hall Reader, 8th Edition ©2007

Miller

Correlated to: National Advanced Placement® (AP®) English Literature and Composition Course Objectives (Grades 9–12)

SE = Student Edition
AIE = Annotated Instructor's Edition

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION

The Course: The AP® Language and Composition course assumes that students already understand and use standard English grammar. The intense concentration on language use in this course should enhance their ability to use grammatical conventions both appropriately and with sophistication as well as to develop stylistic maturity in their prose. Stylistic development is nurtured by emphasizing the following:
• a wide-ranging vocabulary used appropriately and effectively; SE/AIE: Questions on Vocabulary and Style, 59, 74, 81, 88, 94, 100, 108, 130, 136, 143, 151, 159, 179, 186, 192, 200, 209, 230, 234, 240, 247, 255, 264, 287, 292, 296, 301, 307, 316, 339, 344, 351, 357, 366, 373, 395, 400, 405, 410, 415, 424, 445, 449, 454, 461, 466, 471, 497, 501, 506, 515, 521, 525, 531, 537, 547, 553, 560, 569, 576
• a variety of sentence structures, including appropriate use of subordination and coordination; SE/AIE: Students apply a variety of sentence structures as they complete the following activities: Writing Suggestions and Focus on Grammar and Writing, 59, 74, 81, 88, 94, 100, 108, 130, 136, 143, 151, 159, 179, 186, 192, 200, 209, 230, 234, 240, 247, 255, 264, 287, 292, 296, 301, 307, 316, 339, 344, 351, 357, 366, 373, 395, 400, 405, 410, 415, 424, 445, 449, 454, 461, 466, 471, 497, 501, 506, 515, 521, 525, 531, 537, 547, 553, 560, 569, 576
• a logical organization, enhanced by specific techniques to increase coherence, such as repetition, transitions, and emphasis; SE/AIE: Narration, 110–160; Description, 161–210; Division and Classification, 211–266; Comparison and Contrast, 267–318; Process, 319–374; Cause and Effect, 375–426; Definition, 427–472; Argument and Persuasion, 473–538; Writing Suggestions, 59, 74, 81, 88, 94, 100, 108, 130, 136, 143, 151, 159, 179, 186, 192, 200, 209, 230, 234, 240, 247, 255, 264, 287, 292, 296, 301, 307, 316, 339, 344, 351, 357, 366, 373, 395, 400, 405, 410, 415, 424, 445, 449, 454, 461, 466, 471, 497, 501, 506, 515, 521, 525, 531, 537, 547, 553, 560, 569, 576
• a balance of generalization and specific illustrative detail; and SE/AIE: Gathering and Using Examples, 61–109; Description, 161–210; Division and Classification, 211–266; Argument and Persuasion, 473–538
• an effective use of rhetoric, including controlling tone, establishing and maintaining voice, and achieving appropriate emphasis through diction and sentence structure. SE/AIE: Before Reading, 56, 79, 83, 90, 96, 102, 128, 133, 138, 145, 153, 177, 181, 188, 195, 203, 227, 232, 236, 243, 250, 258, 286, 290, 294, 299, 303, 309, 335, 341, 346, 353, 359, 368, 392, 397, 402, 407, 412, 417, 442, 447, 451, 456, 463, 468, 493, 503, 517, 527, 533, 550, 555, 563, 571; Questions, 58, 81, 87, 93, 100, 107, 130, 135, 143, 150, 158, 179, 185, 191, 200, 209, 229, 234, 240, 247, 255, 264, 287, 291, 296, 301, 307, 316, 339, 344, 350, 357, 365, 373, 394, 399, 405, 410, 415, 424, 445, 449, 453, 460, 466, 470, 496, 500, 505, 515, 521, 525, 530, 537, 547, 552, 560, 568, 576
Upon completing the Language and Composition course, then, students should be able to:
• analyze and interpret samples of good writing, identifying and explaining an author's use of rhetorical strategies and techniques; SE/AIE: Narration, 110–160; Description, 161–210; Division and Classification, 211–266; Comparison and Contrast, 267–318; Process, 319–374; Cause and Effect, 375–426; Definition, 427–472; Argument and Persuasion, 473–538; Revising, 32–43
• apply effective strategies and techniques in their own writing; SE/AIE: Writing Suggestions and Focus on Grammar and Writing, 59, 74, 81, 88, 94, 100, 108, 130, 136, 143, 151, 159, 179, 186, 192, 200, 209, 230, 234, 240, 247, 255, 264, 287, 292, 296, 301, 307, 316, 339, 344, 351, 357, 366, 373, 395, 400, 405, 410, 415, 424, 445, 449, 454, 461, 466, 471, 497, 501, 506, 515, 521, 525, 531, 537, 547, 553, 560, 569, 576
• create and sustain arguments based on readings, research, and/or personal experience; SE/AIE: Narration, 110–160; Description, 161–210; Division and Classification, 211–266; Comparison and Contrast, 267–318; Process, 319–374; Cause and Effect, 375–426; Definition, 427–472; Argument and Persuasion, 473–538; Revising, 32–43
• demonstrate understanding and mastery of standard written English as well as stylistic maturity in their own writings; SE/AIE: Writing Suggestions and Focus on Grammar and Writing, 59, 74, 81, 88, 94, 100, 108, 130, 136, 143, 151, 159, 179, 186, 192, 200, 209, 230, 234, 240, 247, 255, 264, 287, 292, 296, 301, 307, 316, 339, 344, 351, 357, 366, 373, 395, 400, 405, 410, 415, 424, 445, 449, 454, 461, 466, 471, 497, 501, 506, 515, 521, 525, 531, 537, 547, 553, 560, 569, 576; Narration, 110–160; Description, 161–210; Division and Classification, 211–266; Comparison and Contrast, 267–318; Process, 319–374; Cause and Effect, 375–426; Definition, 427–472; Argument and Persuasion, 473–538; Revising, 32–43
• write for a variety of purposes; SE/AIE: Writing Suggestions, 59, 74, 81, 88, 94, 100, 108, 130, 136, 143, 151, 159, 179, 186, 192, 200, 209, 230, 234, 240, 247, 255, 264, 287, 292, 296, 301, 307, 316, 339, 344, 351, 357, 366, 373, 395, 400, 405, 410, 415, 424, 445, 449, 454, 461, 466, 471, 497, 501, 506, 515, 521, 525, 531, 537, 547, 553, 560, 569, 576; Narration, 110–160; Description, 161–210; Division and Classification, 211–266; Comparison and Contrast, 267–318; Process, 319–374; Cause and Effect, 375–426; Definition, 427–472; Argument and Persuasion, 473–538
• produce expository, analytical, and argumentative compositions that introduce a complex central idea and develop it with appropriate evidence drawn from primary and/or secondary source material, cogent explanations, and clear transitions; and SE/AIE: Argument and Persuasion, 472–489; Essay, 59, 74, 81, 88, 94, 100, 108, 130, 136, 143, 151, 159, 179, 186, 192, 200, 209, 230, 234, 240, 247, 255, 264, 287, 292, 296, 301, 307, 316, 339, 344, 351, 357, 366, 373, 395, 400, 405, 410, 415, 424, 445, 449, 454, 461, 466, 471, 497, 501, 506, 515, 521, 525, 531, 537, 547, 553, 560, 569, 576; Finding, Using and Documenting Sources, 579–613
• move effectively through the stages of the writing process, with careful attention to inquiry and research, drafting, revising, editing, and review. SE/AIE: Writing Suggestions, 59, 74, 81, 88, 94, 100, 108, 130, 136, 143, 151, 159, 179, 186, 192, 200, 209, 230, 234, 240, 247, 255, 264, 287, 292, 296, 301, 307, 316, 339, 344, 351, 357, 366, 373, 395, 400, 405, 410, 415, 424, 445, 449, 454, 461, 466, 471, 497, 501, 506, 515, 521, 525, 531, 537, 547, 553, 560, 569, 576; Narration, 110–160; Description, 161–210; Division and Classification, 211–266; Comparison and Contrast, 267–318; Process, 319–374; Cause and Effect, 375–426; Definition, 427–472; Argument and Persuasion, 473–538; Revising, 32–43
• write thoughtfully about their own process of composition SE/AIE: Analyzing your own writing, 33–34
• revise a work to make it suitable for a different audience Teaching Composition with The Prentice Hall Reader: Using Rewriting Activities
Analyze image as text SE/AIE: Responding to a visual, 75, 125, 174, 224, 283, 332, 389, 439, 489
Evaluate and incorporate reference documents into researched papers SE/AIE: 579–613

Representative Authors

There is no recommended or required reading list for the AP® English Language and Composition course. The following authors are provided simply to suggest the range and quality of reading expected in the course. Teachers may select authors from the names below or may choose others of comparable quality and complexity. The following are a list of authors represented in The Prentice Hall Reader.

Maya Angelou, 133; Margaret Atwood, 468; Elizabeth Barrett Browning, 222; Bernard Berelson, 250; Duane BigEagle, 172; David Bodanis, 227; Judy Brady, 447; Susan Britt, 299; David Brooks, 353; Joan Jacobs Brumberg, 397; Veronica Chambers, 412; Judith Ortiz Cofer, 145, 243; Diana Cole, 356; Edwidge Danticat, 90; Debra Anne Davis, 177; Joan Didion, 563; Aaron Copeland, 236; Meghan Daum, 309; Charlie Drozdyk, 359; Barbara Ehrenreich, 232; Lars Eighner, 335; Nora Ephron, 341; Joseph Epstein, 258; Martin Espada, 281; E.M. Foster, 392; David Gelernter, 523; Malcolm Gladwell, 417; Bob Greene, 83, Gordon Grice, 56; Tom Haines, 138; Leslie Heywood, 96; John Hollander, 463; Evans D. Hopkins, 153; Langston Hughes, 128; Alice Jones, 437; Jennifer Kahn, 368; Robin D. G. Kelley, 451; Martin Luther King, Jr., 527; Alfie Kohn, 508; William Least Heat Moon, 188; Linda Lee, 499; Bret Lott, 73; Andres Martin, 402; Peggy McNally, 123; Janice Mirikitani, 329; N. Scott Momaday, 181; George Orwell, 102; Wilfred Owen, 487; Marge Piercy, 387; Mary Pipher, 294; Kathleen Porter, 494; Sister Helen Prejean, 518; Anna Quindlen, 79; Richard Rodriguez, 533; Scott Russell Sanders, 203; Esmeralda Santiago, 286; Danzy Senna, 303; Peter Singer, 571; Brent Staples, 407;Ben Stein, 442; Jonathan Swift, 540; Amy Tan, 456; Lewis Thomas, 6; Ronna Vanderslice, 504; E.B. White, 555; Terry Tempest Williams, 195; Virginia Woolf, 550; William Zinsser, 290
Autobiographers and Diarists
Maya Angelou SE/AIE: 133
Judith Ortiz Cofer SE/AIE: 145
Richard Rodriguez SE/AIE: 533
Essayists and Fiction Writers
Margaret Atwood SE/AIE: 468
Scott Russell Sanders SE/AIE: 203
Political Writers
Martin Luther King, Jr. SE/AIE: 527

Reference: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com

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