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Responding to the Needs of Diverse Learners

Patricia O'Connor

Revolution Unit: Objectives

Primary Themes

Revolution
Tolerance/Intolerance

Secondary Themes

Democracy
Economy
Persecution
Puritan Values

Unit Objectives

  1. Students will demonstrate a conceptual understanding of revolution satisfying the following:
    1. How can revolution be defined?
    2. How does revolution come about?
    3. What conditions seem to be necessary for revolution to occur?
    4. How can various revolutions be compared and contrasted?
    5. What are the short-term consequences? Long-term consequences?
    6. How do people exhibit the effects of revolution?

  2. Students will demonstrate an ability to recall various facts concerning the American Revolution.

  3. Students will demonstrate conceptual understanding of the American Revolution in regards to revolution in general.

  4. Students will demonstrate conceptual understanding of democracy satisfying the following:
    1. How can democracy be defined?
    2. What are the facts that describe the historical development?
    3. Do people appear to desire democracy?
    4. What conditions seem to be necessary to enhance the development of democracy?
    5. What aspects of democracy are problematic?

  5. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the early development of democracy in the U.S. in regards to democracy in general.

  6. Students will recall various facts about the settlement of North America from 1607 to 1787.

  7. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how economics was the underlying force behind New World settlement and the historical development of what would become a new nation.

  8. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of basic facts concerning the Puritans, and in particular, the Salem Witch Trials.

  9. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the term "paradox."

  10. Students will practice expressive oral reading while reading assigned parts in The Crucible.

  11. Students will demonstrate a knowledge of plot and character development.

  12. Students will demonstrate a conceptual knowledge of historical fiction.

  13. Students will apply key concepts present in The Crucible (i.e., primary and secondary themes) to other historical and contemporary situations.

  14. Students will demonstrate several writing skills in writing a literary essay.
    1. Format
    2. Use of evidence
    3. Proper use of quotation marks

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